Hunsvotti

(Source: achillles)

tagged as → #Mulan
Voulez-Vous
ABBA

throwbacksongs:

ABBA - Voulez-Vous

Reblog - Posted 1 hour ago - via / Source with 478 notes
tagged as → #Music #Abba

thegestianpoet:

here’s the thing:

  • respect sex workers, but
  • do not defend the porn industry 

(Source: worldofglass)

Reblog - Posted 1 hour ago - via / Source with 7,958 notes
tagged as → #Fullmetal Alchemist

feministwerewolf:

girljanitor:

Lost silent film with all-Native American cast found

The Daughter of Dawn, an 80-minute feature film, was shot in July of 1920 in the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge near Lawton, southwest Oklahoma. It was unique in the annals of silent film (or talkies, for that matter) for having a cast of 300 Comanches and Kiowas who brought their own clothes, horses, tipis, everyday props and who told their story without a single reference to the United States Cavalry. It was a love story, a four-person star-crossed romance that ends with the two main characters together happily ever after. There are two buffalo hunt sequences with actual herds of buffalo being chased down by hunters on bareback just as they had done on the Plains 50 years earlier.

The male lead was played by White Parker; another featured female role was played by Wanada Parker. They were the son and daughter of the powerful Comanche chief Quanah Parker, the last of the free Plains Quahadi Comanche warriors. He never lost a battle to United States forces, but, his people sick and starving, he surrendered at Fort Sill in 1875. Quanah was the son of Comanche chief Peta Nocona and Cynthia Ann Parker, the daughter of Euro-American settlers who had grown up in the tribe after she was kidnapped as a child by the Comanches who killed her parents. She was the model for Stands With a Fist in Dances with Wolves.

You can watch the first ten minutes of the film here. It is over 90 years old, and was produced by, directed by, and stars only Native American people.

Always reblog when this crosses my dash!

tagged as → #Films #History

voxclara:

my hopes for season two of orange is the new black:

  • the word ‘bisexual’
Reblog - Posted 1 hour ago - via / Source with 2,009 notes
tagged as → #Orange is the New Black

hesreallydivine:

flecksofpoppy:

nearlyheadlessfinnick:

newcrystalcitysteel:

boysbootsnbooze:

Merica

I understand that the air force has been through budget cuts but damn

i know, they can’t even afford the new Firebolts

Are those Cleansweep Sevens???
God, so embarrassing.

madebyabvh:

Vincent van Gogh

tagged as → #Vincent van Gogh #Art

ayothewuisback:

White peoples’ definition of racism is hurt feelings, instead of what it actually is, and that’s systematic destruction of an ethnic group. Understand that, and then you’ll understand why racism doesn’t “go both ways”.

tagged as → #Racism
lookninjas:

fl-orida:

kawaiisugah:

mattbellamymuseofspace:

duod:


Many classic horror icons and other disturbing creatures share common characteristics. Pale skin, dark, sunken eyes, elongated faces, sharp teeth, and the like. These images inspire horror and revulsion in many, and with good reason. The characteristics shared by these faces are imprinted in the human mind.
Many things frighten humans instinctively. The fear is natural, and does not need to be reinforced in order to terrify. The fears are species-wide, stemming from dark times in the past when lightning could mean the burning of your tree home, predators could be hiding in the dark, heights could make poor footing lethal, and a spider or snake bite could mean certain death.
The question you have to ask yourself is this:
What happened, deep in the hidden eras before history began, that could effect the entire human race so evenly as to give the entire species a deep, instinctual, and lasting fear of pale beings with dark, sunken eyes, razor sharp teeth, and elongated faces?

To be honest that last question frightened me more that the picture.


That question is what always catches me and makes me want to reblog this

Reblogging for the question as well

What happened, deep in the hidden eras before history began, that could effect the entire human race so evenly as to give the entire species a deep, instinctual, and lasting fear of pale beings with dark, sunken eyes, razor sharp teeth, and elongated faces?
…  well, death happened, probably.
Here’s the thing.  As civilization has progressed, we have divorced ourselves from the natural processes of decomposition, especially in regards to the bodies of other humans.  There are exceptions, always, but for the most part our dead are promptly whisked away to a mortician  to be arranged for burial.  If we see them at all after that, it’s with veins pumped full of embalming fluid, a full face of makeup, and whatever other tricks are necessary to make the deceased look as though they’re merely sleeping. 
Back in the day, however, this was not an option. 
The process of decomposition is different for every corpse, but there’s some things that nearly always apply.  First, the blood and other fluids begin to pool in low-lying areas.  If the corpse is arranged on their back — and you’d think that most humans, upon realizing that their friend or family member had completely ceased moving, would roll them onto their back to look at their face, to check their breathing and see if their eyes would open — this means the blood will drain away from the face and leave the skin markedly paler.  Once rigor mortis has passed, the jaw will slacken as muscles soften, elongating the face.  The gums and other soft tissues retract, leaving hair and nails longer in appearance (your nails don’t grow after death — your cuticles shrink), and the eyes will sink back into the head, leaving them sunken and dark in appearance. 
And there’s your monster, right there.  Pale, dark eyes, long face, sharp teeth.  Literally, the face of death. 

lookninjas:

fl-orida:

kawaiisugah:

mattbellamymuseofspace:

duod:

Many classic horror icons and other disturbing creatures share common characteristics. Pale skin, dark, sunken eyes, elongated faces, sharp teeth, and the like. These images inspire horror and revulsion in many, and with good reason. The characteristics shared by these faces are imprinted in the human mind.

Many things frighten humans instinctively. The fear is natural, and does not need to be reinforced in order to terrify. The fears are species-wide, stemming from dark times in the past when lightning could mean the burning of your tree home, predators could be hiding in the dark, heights could make poor footing lethal, and a spider or snake bite could mean certain death.

The question you have to ask yourself is this:

What happened, deep in the hidden eras before history began, that could effect the entire human race so evenly as to give the entire species a deep, instinctual, and lasting fear of pale beings with dark, sunken eyes, razor sharp teeth, and elongated faces?

To be honest that last question frightened me more that the picture.

That question is what always catches me and makes me want to reblog this

Reblogging for the question as well

What happened, deep in the hidden eras before history began, that could effect the entire human race so evenly as to give the entire species a deep, instinctual, and lasting fear of pale beings with dark, sunken eyes, razor sharp teeth, and elongated faces?

…  well, death happened, probably.

Here’s the thing.  As civilization has progressed, we have divorced ourselves from the natural processes of decomposition, especially in regards to the bodies of other humans.  There are exceptions, always, but for the most part our dead are promptly whisked away to a mortician  to be arranged for burial.  If we see them at all after that, it’s with veins pumped full of embalming fluid, a full face of makeup, and whatever other tricks are necessary to make the deceased look as though they’re merely sleeping. 

Back in the day, however, this was not an option. 

The process of decomposition is different for every corpse, but there’s some things that nearly always apply.  First, the blood and other fluids begin to pool in low-lying areas.  If the corpse is arranged on their back — and you’d think that most humans, upon realizing that their friend or family member had completely ceased moving, would roll them onto their back to look at their face, to check their breathing and see if their eyes would open — this means the blood will drain away from the face and leave the skin markedly paler.  Once rigor mortis has passed, the jaw will slacken as muscles soften, elongating the face.  The gums and other soft tissues retract, leaving hair and nails longer in appearance (your nails don’t grow after death — your cuticles shrink), and the eyes will sink back into the head, leaving them sunken and dark in appearance. 

And there’s your monster, right there.  Pale, dark eyes, long face, sharp teeth.  Literally, the face of death. 

tagged as → #Quite interesting

conceptartthings:

Concept Art from Prince of Egypt (1998)

tagged as → #Prince of Egypt

(Source: suicidewatch)

Reblog - Posted 2 hours ago - via / Source with 481 notes

deanandsamarebrothers:

squidsqueen:

dw:

when did we replace the word “said” with “was like”

When it occured to us that “said” implies a direct quote, while “was like” clarifies that you mean to communicate the person’s tone and general point without quoting them word for word.

thank you. thank you so much. so very very much. thank you.

It begins with this obvious observation: Whales poop. In fact, they poop mightily."
tagged as → #ok

(Source: engagingspirk)

tagged as → #Star trek #The Hobbit