Hunsvotti

larryrickardfan:

allmymetaphors:

I don’t want to go to college but I also don’t want to NOT go to college

What I really want is to stop existing but you can’t do that without dying and I don’t want to die either

This is the most accurate post I have ever seen

(Source: waitingondhr)

tagged as → #Emma Watson
Bad Moon Rising
Mourning Ritual

I see a bad moon rising.
I see trouble on the way.
I see earthquakes and lightning.
I see bad times today.

(Source: derekcastiel)

tagged as → #Music #Mourning Ritual

turkey-imported-from-maine:

firelorcl:

meladoodle:

i wanna be a reverse tooth fairy where i rob people and then scatter human teeth on their bed

a dentist

i dont know what your dentist is doing to you but i think you need to go to the police

punkrockluna:

This summer… Two supporting characters from a beloved Shakespeare classic adopt a child! Hijinks ensue in— Rosencrantz And Guildenstern Are Dad

tagged as → #Punnery

(Source: hyperchaotic)

April is the cruelest month, breeding
lilacs out of the dead land, mixing
memory and desire, stirring
dull roots with spring rain."
— T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land (via afterthenovels)

(Source: hellanne)

tagged as → #Poetry #T. S. Eliot
Fever
The Black Keys

boyfriend-music:

The Black Keys “Fever“

Fever ‘cause I’m breaking
Fever got me aching
Fever how will you explain
Break it down again
Fever got me guilty
Just go ahead and kill me
Fever how will you explain
Break it down again

Reblog - Posted 19 hours ago - via / Source with 440 notes
tagged as → #Music #The Black Keys

artfella:

snapai:

pikapetey:

I surprisingly see this a lot, especially in fandoms.  I figured I’d make an official list of rules.  We wouldn’t want any dis-respecting going on. 

Petey tells it like it “is”.

Good points.

tagged as → #Long post #Internet phenomena
sylentsage:

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math


w….wow.

sylentsage:

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. 

Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. 

Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. 

Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”

After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” 

As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”

In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. 

Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. 

To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/

To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/

For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281

To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229

And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math

w….wow.

tagged as → #Yes good #Menstruation
Anonymous asked: what about macklemore's tweets though and his obvious appropriation of homosexuals as an attempt at getting attention?

faisdm:

b-random:

kripke-is-my-king:

He’s not attempting to get attention. He has attention. He’s a celebrity and a white male. Our fucked up society dictates that he will get attention regardless of what he does. He could sing about sex and objectify women and get the same level of attention he has now. But Macklemore is using his position in favor of other people. He’s spreading a positive message about equality and love. He’s in a position of power, and he’s using it to give voice to people who - in this awful social system America has set up - aren’t in a place of equal opportunity to spread that message themselves. 

If he were a gay man saying these things, no one would call it appropriation. They’d call it beautiful. But because this site has developed some sick and ridiculous abhorrence for allies, they’re turning on him. 

You can’t preach that you want CIS and straight people to accept you, and then flip the fuck out when they do and say they’re doing it for attention and to make themselves seem like a good person. It never occurs to people on here that some people are just genuinely being good. 

In regards to his tweets, the ones that I’ve seen going around are from five years ago. Tell me you didn’t say anything stupid five years ago, and I will call you a liar. I know I was dumb when I was 16. The shit that came out of my mouth would make me scream today if I heard it. 

People grow and change. They learn. 

And it’s about time tumblr did as much.

The fact that I see as much shit insulting Macklemore and his message as I see dissing Robin Thicke makes me want to puke

Thicke sang about rape. 

Macklemore sings about love and equality. 

Tumblr is never fucking pleased. There are people on here so intent on feeling victimized and insulted that they refuse to take a beautiful thing for what it is. Instead, they assume it is concealed bigotry. There’s enough hate and abuse in this world without us fabricating it ourselves in situations where it doesn’t exist. 

Believe it or not, some people are just being good people. They’re not doing it for attention. They’re doing it because it’s the right thing to do. 

Two things:

1) One of the tweets Macklemore is getting in trouble for is because he used the words “Dykes” and “Drag Queens” to describe the teams playing at the baseball game he was attending. Here’s the catch: The event was actually called “Dykes vs. Drag Queens”. He was attending a baseball game with queer players. That’s not homophobic. That’s supportive.

2) Even if the other tweets were actually homophobic, the POINT of the whole Gay Pride movement is to educate and change the minds of homophobic people. That’s how you end oppression, by changing people’s minds. So if Macklemore was making homophobic tweets five years ago, and now he’s singing anthems for human rights, THAT MEANS THE MOVEMENT IS WORKING.

As irksome as it can be that it’s really hard for gay performers and creators to get noticed, and that if a gay performer or creator speaks out about gay rights they will immediately lose public attention and be pigeonholed as a person who makes things for gay people that only gay people need to be invested in (this sadly also effects many PoC performers and especially creators, but that’s a whole other big story I don’t have space to go into here), it’s still the world we’re living in. We can’t campaign in the fantasy world we’d like to live in; we have to work within the society we have.

If Macklemore can make the music scene and general populace more comfortable with and accepting of GSM people, it gives us that little step up by normalising it and making it clear that GSM issues aren’t just a thing that only GSM people need to pay attention to and talk about.

It’s not ideal, but as a member of the GSM community I think it’s a nice little step in the right direction, because people who I know who always kind of just didn’t talk about these things, who supported on the quiet but never actually voiced their support, have latched onto the leadership of people like Macklemore and Lady Gaga and that it’s now acceptable and cool to be openly supportive; even my obnoxious younger brother is now trying his best to stop using ‘gay’ as a derogatory term, after ignoring my telling him for years. Not everybody is a leader or somebody with a position of power others will listen to and above the level where backlash could potentially hurt them. Not everybody is brave enough to openly support something controversial. Not everybody is strong enough to boldly do and say whatever they want without a role model or a group to make them feel safe and show them the way.

Whatever his motivation actually was, I feel that the result has been in our favour. Instead of complaining about him, we should be using this momentum to keep this wave of change going, to make things better for the GSM community, and particularly now things are getting a lot better for the Gay and Lesbian side of things, start focusing our efforts on acceptance for trans* and also for PoC GSM people, who really need the support and visibility.

delusioninabox:

Daily #492! Some days may even be a bit of both.

tagged as → #Life

(Source: farewell-raggedy-man)

Reblog - Posted 19 hours ago - via / Source with 182 notes
tagged as → #karen gillan
  • every sidekick in any movie: you did it!
  • every main character in any movie: no, we did it